1. Welcome to Religious Forums, a friendly forum to discuss all religions in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Access to private conversations with other members.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

Discover Islam ...

Discussion in 'Islam DIR' started by Cordoba, Aug 14, 2008.

  1. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Why Did God Create the Universe? [/FONT]

    The universe, which has been ornamented with every sort of art, is like an endless parade or exhibition designed to attract us and make us reflect. Its extraordinary diversity and magnificent adornment, the sheer abundance and flow of events, present a certain reality to our senses and minds.

    Muslims believe that this reality indicates the existence of an agent who brings it into being. Islam teaches that it is through the reality of His works and deeds we come to know the Doer, and so His Names. Through these Names, we try to know His Attributes.

    Through the channels and prayers opened to our hearts, we strive to know Him in Himself. This raising up of our being is inspired across a wide domain of reality — things, events, the vast realm of humanity's stewardship, as well as the relation or connection between us and the universe and the realm of God's Names and Attributes

    While we perceive things from a human perspective, the way Muslims see it, God does not. While we act out of necessity or desire, God does not. In other words, we cannot ascribe human attributes and motivations to God.

    But why did God create all of this? ...

    (Find out the answer ...)

    http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1217798733308&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout

     
    • Like Like x 3
  2. nuaeman

    nuaeman Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Messages:
    16
    Ratings:
    +1
    Really good and useful knowledge. Jazakallah for bring this information. I hope we have more information like this here. You give me some idea what to share with my readers at my blog. Thanks a lot.
     
  3. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Who Is "Allah"? [/FONT]

    Allah is the Arabic form of the word "The One True God". Muslims worship the exact same God that Jews and Christians do.

    However, Muslims prefer to call God by His proper name Allah and refrain from using the word "god" itself since it can be attributed to so many other things. For example, in proper English the feminine form of "god" is "goddess" and let’s look at Greek Mythology where the Greeks worshipped many "gods".

    Muslims believe that Allah is the One and Only God without partners and that the name "Allah" is unique to the sole Creator of this World and everything in it. To liken Allah to another supposed god in any way shape or form is to commit the one unforgivable sin of shirk, or ascribing partners to Allah.

    http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1203758872359&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout
     
  4. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Why Prophet Muhammad Emigrated to Madinah [/FONT]

    The Unique Environment of Madinah

    In the first place, it was free from any hostile feelings like those which existed in Makkah.
    Hence Islam, with its clear and simple logic, had a great appeal among its inhabitants. Secondly, the monotheistic idea was particularly appealing to the Arabs of Madinah, owing to their respect for the Jewish religion. ...

    http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1218650300037&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout
     
  5. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Truthfulness… Staircase to Heaven [/FONT]

    Certain virtues are highly valued in all societies, one of which is truthfulness. Islam recognizes that other religions and communities attach great importance to such virtues. Islam also endorses such virtues and lays strong emphasis on them. Indeed, the Prophet said, "I have been sent with my message in order to complement the best of virtues" (Ahmad and Al-Hakim). In this definition of his message, the Prophet emphasizes that virtues that are acceptable to common sense exist in all societies and are inevitably upheld by all communities. What Islam does is to complement and perfect them.

    Indeed, Islam has a unique way of doing that. It imparts to its followers a sense of direction that remains present in their minds throughout their lives. The ultimate aim is to win admission into Heaven. Every action we do can either bring us closer to that overall aim or move us away from it.

    Therefore, Muslims always weigh up their actions before embarking on them. If they are of strong faith, they have no hesitation in refraining from doing anything that diminishes the likelihood of them being admitted into Heaven. They are always aware that they may die at any moment, and they know that they must be prepared for the hereafter. Any indulgence in anything forbidden moves them away from attaining their goal.
    Therefore, they are always on their guard.

    It is not surprising, therefore, that Islam stresses the great importance of those virtues that affect people's behavior and their standing in society. One of these is truthfulness. Islam views falsehood in any form as utterly repugnant. To tell a lie is something that is totally unacceptable in Islam. The Prophet was once asked about various actions that Islam forbids and whether a believer may commit any of these. He said that a believer may be guilty of such forbidden things as theft, adultery, and drinking intoxicants, but a believer cannot tell a lie. Telling a lie is against the very concept of faith ...

    http://www.islamonline.net/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1175008701546&pagename=Zone-English-Living_Shariah%2FLSELayout
     
  6. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Ablution: A Dual Message of Spirituality and Cleanliness [/FONT]

    The Islamic ordinance of ablution depicts an excellent example of how Islam combines the concept of spirituality with temporal affairs or — to be more precise in this case — personal hygiene and cleanliness.

    To better understand this, one has to apprehend the optimal station of a person's relationship with God, a station that should be aspired to by all and that forms the cornerstone of a person's relationship with God.

    This station is the love for God. It is the highest aim of true believers who truly love God and reach a point where God loves them back ...

    Ablution: A Dual Message of Spirituality and Cleanliness - Reading Islam.com
     
  7. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]P[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]urpose of Fasting [/FONT]


    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The Qur’an says what means, (O you who believe, fasting is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those who were before you, in order that you may learn taqwa (piety)) (Al-Baqarah 2:183). [/FONT]


    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Taqwa is a very important spiritual and ethical term of the Qur’an. It is the sum total of all Islamic spirituality and ethics. It is a quality in a believer’s life that keeps him/her aware of Allah all the time. A person who has taqwa loves to do good and to avoid evil for the sake of Allah. Taqwa is piety, righteousness and consciousness of Allah. Taqwa requires patience and perseverance. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Fasting teaches patience, and with patience one can rise to the high position of taqwa. [/FONT]


    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) said that fasting is a shield. It protects a person from sin and lustful desires[/FONT]

    The Meaning and Rules of Fasting - Reading Islam.com
     
  8. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The Spiritual and Health Benefits of Ramadan Fasting[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The physiological effect of fasting includes lowering of blood sugar, lowering of cholesterol and lowering of the systolic blood pressure. In fact, Ramadan fasting would be an ideal recommendation for the treatment of mild to moderate, stable, non-insulin diabetes, obesity, and essential hypertension. In 1994 the first International Congress on "Health and Ramadan", held in Casablanca, entered 50 extensive studies on the medical ethics of fasting. While improvement in many medical conditions was noted; however, in no way did fasting worsen any patients' health or their baseline medical condition. On the other hand, patients who are suffering from sever diseases, whether type I diabetes or coronary artery disease, kidney stones, etc., are exempt from fasting and should not be allowed to fast.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]There are psychological effects of fasting as well. There is a peace and tranquility for those who fast during the month of Ramadan. Personal hostility is at a minimum, and the crime rate decreases. Muslims take advice from the Prophet who said, "If one slanders you or aggresses against you, say I am fasting." This psychological improvement could be related to better stabilization of blood glucose during fasting as hypoglycemia after eating, aggravates behavior changes. There is a beneficial effect of extra prayer at night. This not only helps with better utilization of food but also helps in energy output. There are 10 extra calories output for each unit of the prayer. Again, we do not do prayers for exercise, but a mild movement of the joints with extra calorie utilization is a better form of exercise. Similarly, recitation of the Quran not only produces a tranquility of heart and mind, but improves the memory.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]One of the odd nights in the last 10 days of Ramadan is called the night of power when angels descend down, and take the prayer of worship to God for acceptance.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Fasting is a special act of worship which is only between humans and God since no one else knows for sure if this person is actually fasting. Thus God says in hadith qudsi that "Fasting is for Me and I only will reward it". In another hadith, the Prophet Mohammad (peace be upon him) has said "If one does not give up falsehoods in words and actions, God has no need of him giving up food and drink". [/FONT]

    </title> <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/English/Ramadan/1429/templates/css.css"> </head> <body topmargin="0" leftmargin="0" rightmargin="0" bottommargin="0"> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="1004"> <tr> <td widt
     
  9. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Achieving Piety Through Fasting [/FONT]

    Islam teaches that the purpose of fasting is not to make people hungry and thirsty, or to deprive them some of their comfort and conveniences. The real purpose of fasting, according to Islam, is to learn piety.

    Piety is highly emphasized in the Quran and Sunnah. There are more than 158 verses in the Quran on piety, and there are hundreds of hadiths on this subject.

    Muslim scholars see pietyas being Islam itself. It is the total sum of all Islamic values and virtues. If one has piety,one has achieved everything. Pietyis the consciousness of God. It is to do one's best efforts to live by His commands and to avoid His prohibitions.

    The Quran has used the word pietyto mean consciousness of God, fear of God, worship of God, sincerity in faith, and avoidance of disobedience to God.

    How does fasting build the character of piety according to the Islamic worldview? Let us look at some of the things that a fasting person is supposed to do, and see how they are related to the concept and spirit of piety ...

    Achieving Piety Through Fasting - Reading Islam.com
     
  10. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The Prophet in Ramadan [/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Into the hearts of his followers, the Prophet instilled the love and fear of God and love for humanity. His example was inspiring and irresistible; and each of them became eager to be his closest follower.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]To them he was the sincerest and the most cordial of leaders. And his life was open before them like a book; they could see him practicing most closely in his own life what he was preaching.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Letting the Spirit Reign Supreme[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The Prophet demonstrated to his people how this world is less important than the next, and how the body is less important than the soul. In fasting, the Prophet taught them step by step how to ignore the physical demands so that the spirit reigns supreme.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Abandoning food, drink, and sex was only a prelude to the next stage of greater significance: of conquering avidity and cupidity, lust and licentiousness; of liberating one's mind from flights of passion and fits of temper. Indeed the Prophet said: [/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]"The strong person is not the one who can wrestle someone else down. The strong person is the one who can control himself when he is angry." (Bukhari) [/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Also about the effect of fasting on one's behavior, the Prophet said, "Fasting is a shield, so the one who fasts should avoid obscene speech and ignorant behaviour. If someone abuses him or starts to fight with him, he should reply by saying: 'I am fasting. I am fasting'." (Bukhari)[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The core of fasting according to the Prophet was one's willingness not merely to give up self-indulgence, but to feel the need of one's brother as one's own. And no one was more kind-hearted and generous than the Messenger of God; and his generosity reached its peak in Ramadan. (Bukhari)[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The Prophet stressed on the importance of treating people nicely when he said:[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]"Make things easy for people and do not make them difficult, and cheer people up and do not drive them away." (Bukhari)[/FONT]

    The Prophet in Ramadan - Reading Islam.com
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Nafilah [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]([/FONT][FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]supererogatory acts of worship[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif])[/FONT]: A Pathway for Lovers[/FONT]

    Nafilah is a word imbued with beauty and meaning, and no matter how much was said about its interpretation and its essence, one of its meanings is that of increase and addition. In terms of Islamic Shari`ah, it means supererogatory acts of worship in addition to the obligatory amount (in Arabic, it is: fard) of its same kind.

    Some people think that Nafilah is limited to prayers, but the truth is that in any act of worship, there is the obligatory and the supererogatory. Prayer has its nafilah, zakah has its nafilah, fasting has its nafilah, and even pilgrimage has a nafilah.

    It is indeed one of the amazing aspects of Islam to obligate the minimum required — the fard — in every act worship, then encourage additions and leave the door open to increase with no limiting boundary. Thus, the door is open for soaring, and the horizon is vast for those who wish to fly, so where are the ambitious?

    Secrets and Benefits of Nafilah

    Nafilah is a shield that protects the obligatory acts from being weakened, since a person who keeps Nafilah will be more careful to keep the obligations. ...

    Nawafil are supporters, since on the Day of Judgment they will make up for whatever shortcomings or defects in the obligatory worship; defects that do not nullify the act of worship. ...

    Nafilah is a proof of true loyalty to Almighty Allah. ...

    Nafilah is a sign that the believer wishes to get closer to Almighty Allah. ...

    Nafilah is a wide source for making gains and collecting great rewards with no limits or boundaries. ...

    Nafilah is a means to keeping constant communication with Almighty Allah and living hour by hour in His obedience and under His protection. ...

    </title> <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/English/Ramadan/1429/templates/css.css"> </head> <body topmargin="0" leftmargin="0" rightmargin="0" bottommargin="0"> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="1004"> <tr> <td widt
     
  12. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Causes and Remedy of Anger[/FONT]

    The remedy of any defect mainly depends on the elimination of its causes. Self-admiration, joking, argumentation, and betrayal are among the primary causes of anger. Undoubtedly, these are ill morals that the Shari`ah condemns, and in order to get rid of them, people should treat each of them with its opposite.

    To remedy the habitual anger, the Muslim, male or female, should do certain things, as follows:

    First: He should become well acquainted with the virtues of forgiveness, forbearance, endurance, and restraining anger.

    Second: He should frighten himself with the punishment of Allah the Almighty by saying to himself, “Allah’s might over me is much greater than my might over that person (who has enraged me), so if I punish him now, I cannot be sure I will be safe from Allah’s punishment on the Day of Resurrection, and I am much more in need of His forgiveness (than His punishment)!”

    Third: He should warn himself against the consequences of enmity, revenge, and glee at the misfortune of his disputants, for, like them, he is not free from calamities that may afflict him at any time.

    Fourth: He should meditate on how ugly his image seems when he is angry and on that he should not lead himself to such a terrible image.

    Fifth: He should think over the cause that invites him to take revenge. For example, the cause of his anger may be because Satan says to him, “You should not stand still after hearing such humiliating words (that he may have just heard from someone), otherwise you will become humble in the sight of people.” At that moment, he should say to himself, “Do you fear that you should become humble in the sight of people and do not fear of being humble in the sight of Allah, the angels, and prophets?” In this way, he may restrain his anger and escape from the destructive traps of Satan.

    Sixth: He should remember that his anger has been caused by something that happened according to Allah’s will and not his own will, so how can he comply with his own will other than the will of Allah the Almighty?

    This is how the Muslim should act when he has the flaw of anger so that he may avoid its ruinous and baleful consequences.

    </title> <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/English/Ramadan/1429/templates/css.css"> </head> <body topmargin="0" leftmargin="0" rightmargin="0" bottommargin="0"> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="1004"> <tr> <td widt
     
  13. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Does God Hear me? [/FONT]

    Recently, I asked God for something very, very important to me. I prayed to Him night and day. I got up in the early morning to pray extra devotional prayers before sunrise to make that supplication to Him. I prayed to God at times when the Prophet [​IMG] said God will answer those who pray to Him. I prayed almost constantly for this particular thing. It did not come.

    Needless to say, I was sad and disappointed. In the midst of my sadness, a barrage of thoughts and questions raced through my head: "What went wrong? Was it something I did or said? Is God angry with me?" In fact, I almost wanted to say, "Why?" Furthermore, my sadness gave way to momentary spiritual weakness in that I had transient thoughts of rebellion against God. I said to myself, "All this prayer, and it was not answered. Did God not hear me?"

    No, God indeed did hear me, but He chose not to give me what I asked of Him at this particular moment in my life. The above exchange in my head was born out of the fact that I am a human being, subject to all of the weaknesses and hypocrisies of the human condition.

    http://www.islamicity.com/articles/Articles.asp?ref=IC0809-3659
     
  14. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The Prophet Muhammad Today
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Helvetica][/FONT]
    [FONT=Verdana, Helvetica]Black and white, red and yellow, followers of the Prophet Muhammad come from all races. Whether in Asia or Europe, Africa or America, in every nook and cranny of this globe, you are sure to find Muslims. They live in the most advanced, sprawling megalopolis as well as in the most primitive nomadic tent, village, hamlet, and even in the bush.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Helvetica]As now so always, down the centuries, across the planet, from end to end, billions and billions of men and women have lived all their lives, loving the Prophet and trying to follow in his footsteps, as no one else has been so loved and followed.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Helvetica][FONT=Verdana, Helvetica]They have lived and died, believed and acted, married and raised families, worshipped and ruled, made war and peace, even eaten and dressed, walked and slept, just as he did or taught them to do.[/FONT][/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Helvetica]Indeed, never in history has a man influenced mankind, even beyond his death, so deeply and so pervasively as he has. He brings light and peace to countless hearts and lives. They love him more dearly than their own selves. In him they find their greatest source of inspiration and guidance.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Helvetica]He is the ultimate norm and the perfect example for them. Faith in him is their mainstay, and he is their chief source of support and comfort in all personal vicissitudes and tribulations. They also look to him to lead them through social and political turmoil.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Helvetica]He has always inspired them to greater and greater heights of spiritual and moral upliftment and civilizational achievements. And still does.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana, Helvetica]In short, they believe that through him, a human like themselves, God has spoken to them, and guided him to live amongst them, setting an example and a model for all times to come.[/FONT]

    http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1220346290567&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout
     
  15. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The Fruits of Fasting
    [/FONT]
    Fasting instills compassion in humans. A compassionate society is better than an arrogant society. In addition, only when you are in one's shoes can you know where they pinch. It is only by staying hungry, and keeping our regular activities, we can know how those less fortunate than us get through the day.

    This compassion would inculcate the practice of regular charity. Charity in turn would benefit the economy of a society. There would be more equal distribution of wealth, and the less privileged would enjoy a better life.

    Now let's see benefits for the individual. As per research done by Dr. Elson M. Haas, M.D., Director of the Preventive Medical Center of Marin, California, fasting is one of the best natural therapies for detoxification and cleansing of the system, which is one of the trilogies of nutrition.

    According to Otto Buchinger, Sr., M.D., Germany's great therapist, "Fasting is, without any doubt, the most effective biological method of treatment... it is the 'operation without surgery'... it is a cure involving exudation, re-attunement, redirection, loosening up and purified relaxation."

    Similarly, there has been sufficient research to prove that fasting adds to healthy living, and is beneficial to humans.

    Furthermore, fasting helps improve self-control. ...

    http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1220866968768&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout
     
  16. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The Fasting of Ramadan: A Time for Thought, Action, and Change![/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana,arial]"Fasting in Ramadan develops in a person the real spirit of social belonging, of unity and brotherhood, and of equality before God. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana,arial]This spirit is the natural product of the fact that when people fast they feel that they are joining the whole Muslim society (which makes up more than one fifth of world's population) in observing the same duty, in the same manner, at the same time, for the same motives, and for the same end. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana,arial]No sociologist or historian can say that there has been at any period of history anything comparable to this powerful institution of Islam: Fasting in the month of Ramadan. People have been crying throughout the ages for acceptable 'belonging', for unity, for brotherhood, for equality, but how echoless their voices have been, and how very little success they have met..." says Hammudah Abdalati, in Islam in Focus.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Verdana,arial]"What is fasting?" "How does the fasting of Muslims in Ramadan differ from the fasting of other faiths?" "Why should one 'torture' one's body in the first place?" "What do you really gain from fasting in the end?"...These are a few questions that a number of non-Muslim friends and colleagues often ask us, usually out of fascination with this spiritually-uplifting practice of Islamic faith, and at times out of pity and sympathy for us, thinking, why should anyone suffer from hunger and thirst like Muslims? ...[/FONT]

    http://www.islamicity.com/articles/Articles.asp?ref=UT0709-3357
     
  17. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Ten Days of Forgiveness: Ready?[/FONT]

    The blessed days of Ramadan are passing so quickly.

    The special days of Allah's great mercy, forgiveness and favors are going; therefore, every one should evaluate the efforts he exerted in Ramadan before it is too late. Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) told us that the first part of Ramadan is for Allah's mercy, its middle is for forgiveness, and its end is for salvation from Hell-fire.

    No one knows whether or not he gained the mercy of Almighty Allah before the end of the first third of Ramadan. We should all be faithful and honest when evaluating our success in gaining His mercy in the first part of this blessed month. We should realize our shortcomings in order not to miss out on the blessings of the few days that remain.

    Now we are favored with the days of forgiveness. Are we ready to work for forgiveness? Have we prepared ourselves to be forgiven by Almighty Allah? It is our great opportunity to repent, to return to Almighty Allah, and to seek His forgiveness. It is a precious time that we should not miss out on. If we fail to gain the forgiveness of Almighty Allah during the days of forgiveness, when would our sins would be forgiven?

    Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him), his companions, and the righteous Muslims throughout the ages used to pay due attention to Ramadan and the blessings it contains. Wise people should never miss the merits of every single day of Ramadan.

    Now, the important question is: How should we seek the forgiveness of Almighty Allah during these blessed days of Ramadan? Below are some tips that we should consider and implement:
    1. Everybody should sincerely repent to Almighty Allah, seeking His forgiveness,
    2. Wrongdoings and prohibitions should be avoided,
    3. One should offer more optional acts of worship such as Tahajjud (night prayer), charity, dhikr, and Qur’an recitation.
    4. Obligatory acts of worship such as the five daily prayers should be carried out properly and faithfully, and
    5. One should earnestly make du`aa’ to Almighty Allah to bless him with His favors and forgiveness.
    O Allah, help us all to gain Your mercy, forgiveness, and blessings, Ameen.

    http://www.islamonline.net/English/Ramadan/Heart_Softening/School/13.shtml
     
  18. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Ramadan: Striving for God Consciousness[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The essence of fasting Ramadan and its goal is summed in the Qur'an in one word: taqwa. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]"O you who believe! Fasting is prescribed to you as it was prescribed to those before you, that you may attain taqwa." (Qur'an 2:183)[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]But what is taqwa? And how does it relate to the physical act of fasting?[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Taqwa is a recurring theme in the Qur'an and a paramount Qur'anic value. Taqwa is both an attitude and a process. It is the proper attitude of the human toward the divine that denotes love, devotion, and fear. Love to the source of good and beauty that make life worth living; devotion to God's boundless wisdom and majesty; and fear of misunderstanding the divine intent or failing in maintaining the appropriate posture and relationship. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]The attitude of taqwa cannot and does not stay in the confines of the human spirit, but is ultimately revealed in expression and action. The attitude of taqwa is ultimately revealed in, and in turn reveals, the true character it nurtures: the commitment to the sublime values stressed by divine revelations of courage, generosity, compassion, honesty, steadfastness, and cooperation in pursuing what is right and true.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Taqwa is equally the process by which the believers internalize the sublime values of revelation and develop their character. Thus the Qur'an reminds the believers that they should not reduce religious practices to a set of blind rituals, of religiously ordained procedures performed at the level of physical movement, and that they should always be mindful that religious practices, like praying and fasting, ultimately aim at bringing about moral and spiritual uplifting ...[/FONT]

    http://www.islamicity.com/articles/Articles.asp?ref=IC0510-2816
     
  19. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]I Am Fasting: Prophet Muhammad in Ramadan[/FONT]

    The Prophet tells us that if someone is to argue or slander a fasting person, he should say: "I am fasting." A lot of people will just read this without reflecting upon what it alludes to. I confess I was one of these people for a long time.

    However, when I discovered what lies behind these words, I was amazed. Such a statement is basically a message in time management and power management. To make this simple, imagine if you are sitting at your office doing something very important and do not want to see anyone, what can you simply do?

    You may think of putting a notice at your door saying 'BUSY.' If you are in a meeting and do not want anyone to interrupt, you will simply either silence your mobile phone or switch it off and turn on the red light at the door of your office.

    This is very important in time management. Otherwise, if you leave everything running as normal, it will be, at least, extremely difficult to accomplish any task.

    Likewise, the sign of 'I am fasting' keeps intruders away and allows you to make the most out of your fasting.

    Upon raising — whether verbally, or mentally — such a sign of 'I am fasting' Muslims are always reminded of our task and main goal, so as not to be consumed in any side tasks like arguing with others, disputing with them, or trying to win a discussion.

    This is a very important lesson in time management and personal development, since the person who puts so many things in front of his eyes will definitely fail to accomplish any of them perfectly.

    In time management, we are always encouraged to plan our time by making a time sheet that specifies what we will be doing at what time and this is definitely what is meant by raising such a sign 'I am fasting.' It is as if you are announcing to any time destroyers that this time is dedicated to this task of fasting and it cannot be spoiled by anything else ...

    http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1221720120173&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout
     
  20. Cordoba

    Cordoba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    8,088
    Ratings:
    +495
    [FONT=Arial,Geneva,Verdana,Sans-Serif]Ramadan's Four Elements [/FONT]

    Like other Islamic injunctions, the benefits of Ramadan are not limited to either "spiritual" or "temporal" elements of life.

    In Islam, the spiritual, social, economic, political, and psychological intermingle in a consistent and cohesive whole

    For convenience of presentation, the significance of fasting is discussed under four subheadings: spiritual and moral, psychological, social, and physical and medical. ...

    http://www.readingislam.com/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1221461431996&pagename=Zone-English-Discover_Islam%2FDIELayout
     
Loading...