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Christianity Is Only Popular Because Of Its Idle Threats

Seriously. If there wasn't a threat of eternal damnation for those who reject Jesus then Christianity wouldn't be nearly as popular as it is today.

Take it from an ex-Christian, the Christian religion is built on fear mongering principles and is systematically designed to instill that fear into those that don't believe in it, so that the unbeliever will be coerced into thinking twice about what happens next after death as that dreadful panic sets in him about possibly ending up burning for eternity. All because Christianity takes a gamble on the "unknown" meaning "the next."

And so the question will be forced upon you which is "do you as an unbeliever want to take a gamble on the unknown and possibly be wrong about what comes next?" So you might as well play it safe and "be a Christian." Yes, this is the psychologicall tactic Christianity will play on you and is designed to do so. But I suspect Islam is constructed very similarly to do the same as well. It's just that Christianity has more followers still and perhaps because it does a much better job at doing that to people.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber & Business Owner
Seriously. If there wasn't a threat of eternal damnation for those who reject Jesus then Christianity wouldn't be nearly as popular as it is today.

Take it from an ex-Christian, the Christian religion is built on fear mongering principles and is systematically designed to instill that fear into those that don't believe in it, so that the unbeliever will be coerced into thinking twice about what happens next after death as that dreadful panic sets in him about possibly ending up burning for eternity. All because Christianity takes a gamble on the "unknown" meaning "the next."

And so the question will be forced upon you which is "do you as an unbeliever want to take a gamble on the unknown and possibly be wrong about what comes next?" So you might as well play it safe and "be a Christian." Yes, this is the psychologicall tactic Christianity will play on you and is designed to do so. But I suspect Islam is constructed very similarly to do the same as well. It's just that Christianity has more followers still and perhaps because it does a much better job at doing that to people.
Is that why our pagan ancestors laughed at it and thought it absurd, and many of them even hating and despising it? Many of them heard of these of these threats of hellfire from the words of men promoting this self-described angry god and considered it a treasonous blasphemy to forsake their own gods and the gods of their ancestors.
 

Suave

Simulated character
Seriously. If there wasn't a threat of eternal damnation for those who reject Jesus then Christianity wouldn't be nearly as popular as it is today.

Take it from an ex-Christian, the Christian religion is built on fear mongering principles and is systematically designed to instill that fear into those that don't believe in it, so that the unbeliever will be coerced into thinking twice about what happens next after death as that dreadful panic sets in him about possibly ending up burning for eternity. All because Christianity takes a gamble on the "unknown" meaning "the next."

And so the question will be forced upon you which is "do you as an unbeliever want to take a gamble on the unknown and possibly be wrong about what comes next?" So you might as well play it safe and "be a Christian." Yes, this is the psychologicall tactic Christianity will play on you and is designed to do so. But I suspect Islam is constructed very similarly to do the same as well. It's just that Christianity has more followers still and perhaps because it does a much better job at doing that to people.

Christianity has thousands of denominations, hundreds of them do not agree with the notion of a literal Hell where non-Christians are subjected to eternal damnation by God.
 

ADigitalArtist

Veteran Member
Staff member
Premium Member
Plenty of Christian denominations don't believe people are sent to hell for not being Christian or even rejecting Christianity even some (like JW) that don't believe in hell-as-a-place-of-torment at all. We're just constantly bombarded by the extremes here in the US because fundamentalism rooted in puritanical culture was used as a long time political tool. It doesnt help that half the nation actively demonize education, the best tool for growing past tribalism. Not too differently from many Islamic states.

The problem isn't Christianity. The same fundamentalism exists in non-christian and even atheist cultures where traditionalism, tribalism, nationalism and cults of personality are allowed to fester. Plenty of irreligious people out there still disown their gay or trans kids, respond with aggression to alternative lifestyles or challenging the long-standing family or cultural status quos.

Focus on that and I think you'll find a more tolerant world even if there's still lots of Christians in it.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber & Business Owner
It's the only one in intimately familiar with.
It's how their own god describes himself. He's angry, wrathful, jealous and he'll kill you, you're entire family and the entire city you live in for disobeying him. He rules through fear. He conquers through fear. He had his own son tortured to death and he created the system for us to fear just to scare us into adoring him and calling him "loving and patient" for giving us a way out of this "Hell" he created, and he had to create it because as a Lord he's not benevolent, merciful, peaceful, patient and those like him tend to end up torn apart by an angry mob of their own people who have had enough of the abuse and tyranny.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber & Business Owner
Christianity has thousands of denominations, hundreds of them do not agree with the notion of a literal Hell where non-Christians are subjected to eternal damnation by God.
Plenty of Christian denominations don't believe people are sent to hell for not being Christian or even rejecting Christianity even some (like JW) that don't believe in hell-as-a-place-of-torment at all. We're just constantly bombarded by the extremes here in the US because fundamentalism rooted in puritanical culture was used as a long time political tool. It doesnt help that half the nation actively demonize education, the best tool for growing past tribalism. Not too differently from many Islamic states.

The problem isn't Christianity. The same fundamentalism exists in non-christian and even atheist cultures where traditionalism, tribalism, nationalism and cults of personality are allowed to fester. Plenty of irreligious people out there still disown their gay or trans kids, respond with aggression to alternative lifestyles or challenging the long-standing family or cultural status quos.

Focus on that and I think you'll find a more tolerant world even if there's still lots of Christians in it.
(reply to both)
I would argue they are doing what Jesus said not to and omitting and lessening what he taught because it's what Jesus himself said, and he said no one avoids it unless they follow him.
 

Sgt. Pepper

All you need is love.
Seriously. If there wasn't a threat of eternal damnation for those who reject Jesus then Christianity wouldn't be nearly as popular as it is today.

Take it from an ex-Christian, the Christian religion is built on fear mongering principles and is systematically designed to instill that fear into those that don't believe in it, so that the unbeliever will be coerced into thinking twice about what happens next after death as that dreadful panic sets in him about possibly ending up burning for eternity. All because Christianity takes a gamble on the "unknown" meaning "the next."

And so the question will be forced upon you which is "do you as an unbeliever want to take a gamble on the unknown and possibly be wrong about what comes next?" So you might as well play it safe and "be a Christian." Yes, this is the psychologicall tactic Christianity will play on you and is designed to do so. But I suspect Islam is constructed very similarly to do the same as well. It's just that Christianity has more followers still and perhaps because it does a much better job at doing that to people.

Oh my god, you really hit the nail on the head with your OP, Only Reason. What you said in your OP is a perfect description of what Christianity was like for me during the 30 years I was a Christian and also for the years before I became a Christian too. I've talked about what the fearmongering tactics of Christianity were like for me and the emotionally devastating impact they had on my life in some of my posts. I remember fearing the wrath of God to the point of making myself physically sick. I lived in constant fear of God striking me down dead at any moment. I was afraid of God's wrath; I was afraid of disobeying God; and I felt a deep shame and guilt for sinning against God. I was constantly afraid of losing my salvation if I sinned against God and then I died without repenting, and I truly feared going to hell even though I accepted Jesus as my lord and savior (Matthew 7:21–23). There was absolutely no peace and joy in my life that was promised in the Bible to the followers of Jesus. To be honest, being a Christian was an absolute nightmare for me, and I never want to be a Christian again. It took me a very long time to finally break free from Christianity and deprogram myself from all the indoctrination that I had been subjected to while I was a Christian. It was very difficult for me to detox from my faith.

I can recall most of the conflicting sermons I heard in church that varied from "God loves you and he sent his son to die for you" to "If you don't obey God's commands, then you'll suffer God's wrath and he'll cast you into hell." I remember thinking, "How can the same pastor tell me God loves me when he also tells me that if I don't obey God, he'll cast me into hell?" I'd also think, "If God loves me like the pastor says he does, then why won't he answer my prayers and stop my mom and older brother from hitting me?" or "Why won't God save me from being abused at home and bullied in school if he loves me so much?" Well, I eventually got to the breaking point when I was a teenager, and I stopped praying to God because I finally realized that there was really no point in praying to him. I finally accepted the fact that God (like my extended family, all of my neighbors, my school teachers, the pastor and congregation at church) wasn't going to save me, and I had to figure out how to save myself from the abuse and bullying if I was going to survive. Well, I found the courage within myself to confront my abusers shortly after I turned 18. I saved myself from the abuse and bullying I suffered.

Long story short, I've disavowed my belief in God and my Christian faith, and I've let go of all the fearmongering tactics of Christianity. It was very difficult for me because I had believed in God and had been a Christian for the majority of my life, but I can honestly say that it was the best decision that I've ever made for my emotional well-being. It was, without a doubt, the best decision that I've ever made for myself. It took some time for me to let go of my faith in God and heal, but forsaking my faith turned my life around for the better. I have peace and joy in my heart, and I feel content with my life. That's something that I never felt during the 30 years I was a Christian and during the years before when I sincerely believed in God and prayed to him, asking him to save me from being abused.
 
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Suave

Simulated character
(reply to both)
I would argue they are doing what Jesus said not to and omitting and lessening what he taught because it's what Jesus himself said, and he said no one avoids it unless they follow him.

J.C reportedly often spoke in parables leaving some of his teachings open to interpretation. :)
 

Sgt. Pepper

All you need is love.
(reply to both)
I would argue they are doing what Jesus said not to and omitting and lessening what he taught because it's what Jesus himself said, and he said no one avoids it unless they follow him.

I thought about you while I was reading the OP because I remember that you've shared your negative experiences with Christianity. I thought about tagging you, but then I got wrapped up in writing my own post. I was glad to see your replies after I posted my post.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber & Business Owner
I thought about you while I was reading the OP because I remember that you've shared your negative experiences with Christianity. I thought about tagging you, but then I got wrapped up in writing my own post. I was glad to see your replies after I posted my post.
I don't get why people do that because the Bible is clearly not a "mix-n-match" on what you follow, especially and particularly when it comes worshiping the God of Abraham. "I am thy Lord thy God." According to some Jews that is the First Commandment, with "thou shalt have no other gods before me" being the second. Anyway you count it the message is very clear. To worship Jehovah (or whatever other name) you must renounce and forsake all other gods. His son is very strict when it comes to associating himself with the God of Abraham and enforcing the Law, up to stating he has NOT come to do away with or lessen any part of the Laws and Prophets.
 

Truth in love

Well-Known Member
Seriously. If there wasn't a threat of eternal damnation for those who reject Jesus then Christianity wouldn't be nearly as popular as it is today.

Take it from an ex-Christian, the Christian religion is built on fear mongering principles and is systematically designed to instill that fear into those that don't believe in it, so that the unbeliever will be coerced into thinking twice about what happens next after death as that dreadful panic sets in him about possibly ending up burning for eternity. All because Christianity takes a gamble on the "unknown" meaning "the next."

And so the question will be forced upon you which is "do you as an unbeliever want to take a gamble on the unknown and possibly be wrong about what comes next?" So you might as well play it safe and "be a Christian." Yes, this is the psychologicall tactic Christianity will play on you and is designed to do so. But I suspect Islam is constructed very similarly to do the same as well. It's just that Christianity has more followers still and perhaps because it does a much better job at doing that to people.

I can’t speak for all, but I never card much for the threat system.

I do value the teachings of choice, love and peace. Also the retirement plan rocks.
 

RestlessSoul

Well-Known Member
It's how their own god describes himself. He's angry, wrathful, jealous and he'll kill you, you're entire family and the entire city you live in for disobeying him. He rules through fear. He conquers through fear. He had his own son tortured to death and he created the system for us to fear just to scare us into adoring him and calling him "loving and patient" for giving us a way out of this "Hell" he created, and he had to create it because as a Lord he's not benevolent, merciful, peaceful, patient and those like him tend to end up torn apart by an angry mob of their own people who have had enough of the abuse and tyranny.


That’s not my God; it may be the one you rejected, and for good reason, but please be aware that whatever those Southern Baptists might have told you, for many Christians, Christ’s message is a message of love.
 
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