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Catholic Meet and Greet

Discussion in 'Catholic DIR' started by Cooky, Oct 19, 2019.

  1. sciatica

    sciatica Notable Member

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    a conservative Christian might suggest Buddhism is nowhere near the truth or even Satanic.
     
  2. exchemist

    exchemist Veteran Member

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    No doubt.

    I was impressed by a policeman on the train to Chiang Mai, who dealt with an invasion of the slow-moving train by enormous flying ants, which he described as "very dangerous", by picking a couple of them up very gently by the wings and putting them out of the window. As he did so he smiled at me and said "my friend". I had not expected such gentleness from an armed man. It turned out he had been a monk for a couple of years before joining the cops. Apparently it is quite common - like military service. It was impossible to argue that Buddhism had not given something of value to this man.
     
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  3. sciatica

    sciatica Notable Member

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    gentleness and compassion are rare commodities these days. especially in the west
     
  4. Maximus

    Maximus the Confessor

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    Greetings brothers and sisters.

    I am Catholic, though more Eastern in orientation.

    Eastern Catholic Churches
    Home - The Ecumenical Patriarchate



    :blueheart:
     
    #24 Maximus, Feb 14, 2020
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020
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  5. Steven Merten

    Steven Merten Active Member

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    Welcome sciatica and Maximus
     
  6. metis

    metis aged ecumenical anthropologist

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    Welcome!
     
  7. Quiddity

    Quiddity UndertheInfluenceofGiants

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    How many active Catholics do we have right now?
     
  8. anna b.

    anna b. Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

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    Hello Catholic group.

    I'm a cradle Catholic, backsliding for a number of years now. I struggle with believing what I was taught and what I taught my own children. And yet - if I was on my deathbed, I'd tell them to call a priest. So... that's about it I guess.
     
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  9. exchemist

    exchemist Veteran Member

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    Ah, someone normal. How nice.

    I think most of us struggle at least some of the time. I've gone through phases of belief and unbelief throughout my life, but, perhaps like you, I have never lost my basic love of the church and the Christian message, whether I take it literally or not. I'm an amateur choral singer, which helps me examine the ideas. But my time in the Middle East (and my Anglican mother) have made me question whether any one religion or denomination can claim to be the only true version - it's what they all say.
     
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  10. anna b.

    anna b. Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

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    Thanks for the welcome. : )

    You packed a lot into that paragraph, I definitely can relate to it. The struggle with belief, the strong pull of foundational Catholicism vs. an awareness or an openness to the idea that "the one true church" - isn't - but if not that, then what?

    We've been dispensed from the Sunday Mass obligation since March, and I admit I've taken that one to the bank. I'm tired of being told that this is a sin, that is a sin, because I distrust the clerics who took it upon themselves to make those rules a millennium or more ago. Most of all, I doubt the power of prayer - if one asks for something and receives it, they thank God. If they don't receive it, they accept it was God's inscrutable will, who can know the wisdom of God?
     
  11. exchemist

    exchemist Veteran Member

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    I'm not attending mass either due to the restrictions. I intend to go back, at least once we can sing again. I'm afraid I find the services without singing a bit uninspiring. I used to be one of the lesson readers and I would quite like to do that again. It's sometimes a challenge trying to work out how to bring to life one of St Paul's more opaque pieces of verbiage;). I find the people friendly and the priests fairly non-judgemental. I make up my own rules on what I regard as sinful: it's pretty clear from the words of Christ, I think. One thing I will not do is take any lectures from the church on sexual morality. It seems obvious that that topic has got hopelessly twisted - and has twisted a good number of priests into the bargain!

    As for the power of prayer, well yes, as someone with science background I am sceptical that it changes the course of physical events, though it can have power to soothe the spirit, I think. (When my wife was dying, I felt I had to stop a faintly creepy Opus Dei guy in the choir from getting some nuns he knew to pray for her. I mean, she had advanced cancer and there was no way she was not going to die: that's just science. I saw no point in asking God for a preposterous miracle, especially us being comfortable middle-class Londoners, while thousands die in poverty and anguish every day. In the end I asked him that, if he wanted to pray for us, just to pray for us all to have the strength to get through it. Which we did, in the end.)

    I do find it is helpful to have an hour in the week when I go to mass, put aside the details of my daily life and try to reorientate myself and put things into the broader perspective of humanity's 2000 year struggle to put into practice at least some of the teaching of Christ. But then, being retired, I perhaps have more time to reflect on my life than others do.
     
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  12. metis

    metis aged ecumenical anthropologist

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    I hope you don't mind me commenting on a few of your statements because they struck home with me.

    This is exactly my position as well, but then what do I know. IOW, I'm even skeptical of my skepticism.

    As Confucius supposedly said [paraphrased] "The more you know, the more you know you really don't know much".
    So sorry to read this, especially since I almost lost my wife last January to the type-B flu. My prayers are with her and you.:heart::heart:

    Again, it seems like we're kindred spirits. I use the mass as a weekly opportunity to meditate and contemplate on my spiritual life that includes some people who changed my life in ways that i never could have anticipated, and one of those is my wife of 53 years.

    Take care, my friend.
     
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