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Can one convert to Hinduism?

Discussion in 'Hinduism DIR' started by Goon, Aug 21, 2013.

  1. Satyamavejayanti

    Satyamavejayanti Well-Known Member

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    I would agree with what a lot of my fellow poster have said,

    IMO

    I don't think you have to convert to Hinduism, its more of a lifestyle choice, it is just like hanging around a different crowd (a good crowd by the way lol).

    There are groups that make it seem official, but many people have just made a choice to believe in the Hindu Philosophy with no specific cultural or religious changes that can been seen in the outward appearance of a person, it is more of a internal "conversion" that is required with Hinduism i think.

    The only thing "new Hindus", have to leave (In my opinion) is their preconceived notions of what Hinduism actually is, Whatever that may be, like how many Gods, requirements of being Vegetarian, going to Temples ect ect, all ideas should be removed and one should start with a fresh look at the core beliefs of Hinduism.

    Personally what i think is that first a person has to become a complete Atheist, then to start reading about Hinduism, its history and litterateur ect, and then trying to understand the many "faces" of the Hindu fold before actually committing them self to being labeled as a Hindu.

    But you don't have to do any of this, just become a Hindu.
     
  2. Kalidas

    Kalidas Well-Known Member

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    WOH sounds like what I did lol. For 4 years after I left Christianity I decided that if I was ever going to find a true religion that worked with me I would have to remove "God" from the equation, and I did just that. I feel God can be found in any path, so remove God and find the "path of least resistance", and here I am.
     
  3. Satyamavejayanti

    Satyamavejayanti Well-Known Member

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    I was more or less a Atheist, not a strong anti-religious type but just did not give a hoot about spirituality or any religions, more what one would call a materialist (Kinda), didn't need any of it, Ishvar was not a requirement in my life.

    It was Arya Veer Shri Hanuman Ji that guided me to this path, don't ask me how, its hard to explain, but it just snowballed from then, If i had more concentration and commitment for Bhakti i would be a staunch Shri Hanuman Bhakta for sure.
     
  4. Kalidas

    Kalidas Well-Known Member

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    Hinduism is one of these cool belief systems that (I feel) God is not 100% necessary to be a "Hindu". It is TOTALLY possible to have the philosophy and thoughts of Hinduism without God involved. It's not common but I think it IS possible.

    That's another thing you will learn Goon. Hinduism is NOT one list of things. It is MANY lists of MANY things.
     
  5. Satyamavejayanti

    Satyamavejayanti Well-Known Member

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    Agree with that.

    OHM TATH SATH
     
  6. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    Or you are NEVER worshiping Gods and Goddesses (as in my case) but still trying to act in a way that would be worthy to the Gods. I am an atheist Hindu.
     
  7. Amrut

    Amrut Aum - Advaita

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    Namaste,

    Theoretically there is no official conversion process in shastra-s though some like Arya Samaj are converting. But this does not mean that one cannot start practicing.

    Simply start practicing and you already live 'the Hindu way of life'. We dont even say it is taboo to keep a photo of Jesus in your house. Only thing is that Vedas do not have any mantras dedicated to Jesus. All you can do is to bow down to him, if you still revere him. But most are comfortable with practicing worshiping only Hindu Gods.

    Good Luck
     
  8. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    The day one understands the core of Hinduism, 'dharma' and accepts to follow it, the person is eligible to call him/herself a Hindu. No rituals involved. Do that if it pleases you or is required for legal processes.
     
  9. Don Penguinoini

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    Depends on what you consider to be Hinduism. I call myself a Hindu of sorts but I do not pray, attend mandir or even regularly read scriptures.

    It culminates to a way of life and philosophy on life and doesn't require a 'conversion' as such, to me.

    I understand it's difficult or intimidating for a non-Indian, but you don't need to be Indian to understand or accept.
     
  10. Vinayaka

    Vinayaka devotee
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    And that seems to vary from 'Everyone is.' to 'Very few people are.'
     
  11. Don Penguinoini

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    I think these are in two main camps that may be further broken down. My type of thinking which is free-er and less restricted by scriptural obligation or rule, and those who have organised Hinduism and systematised it, mainly due to the advent of Abrahamic religion in the sub-continent. That is not a slight for people who think that way either, if all Hindus thought like me, it may not be around today.

    In a way, the other camp's best example of this would be the Swaminarayan faith who believe in a certain religious scripture for their faith, a certain deity, certain disciple, certain line of Guru's etc.
     
  12. Vinayaka

    Vinayaka devotee
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    I'm of your 'other camp', I think. Still I don't see ethical scriptures as 'rules' but as guidelines. Most scriptures aren't particularly ethical, more philosophical.

    I view the extreme liberal (neo-Advaita, for example) as problematic only if they become the teachers, and newcomers start thinking we're some huge free for all anything goes.
     
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  13. Don Penguinoini

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    Certainly, the very nature of Hinduism stops most people (who don't already have underlying dominating tendencies as people) from interpreting and enforcing these guidelines as rules.

    But it all comes down to what people consider as authoritative scripture. Somebody has quoted the Mahabharata to me before as proof that Hindus should never consume any meat product, which flies in the face of the belief/fact that Shri Ram hunted deer in the forest.

    I also agree, I do not want Hinduism to ever be perceived like Buddhism unfortunately is in the West, which is that of a set of wishy washy beliefs and ethics which can be changed to suit you when you wish. I think the extreme liberal are possibly extreme Hindus too in a way, looking for a way to incorporate everything within Hinduism which is also dangerous and does a disservice to our way of thinking.
     
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  14. Amrut

    Amrut Aum - Advaita

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    Namaste,

    Sri Raghavacharya (Ramanujacharya) of Ayodhya gave some reasons for deer hunting

    1. The kasturi in the deer when gets ripe, the deer becomes restless and runs hither-tither. soon the kasturi transforms into poison and sooner or later the deer dies. Those who eat deer also die. Hence to protect other animals, kings used to go for 'mrugiyaa' i.e. hunting for deer those kasturi is ripe. Becides Kasturi may have it's own uses.

    2. Since deer is very agile, hence if you can hunt it, you can hunt anyone i.e. your fighting skills enhances.

    3. It indicates the readiness of a king to fight any kind of danger

    4. The skin obtained from such deer is offered to yogi-s and tapavini-s, saints, who in return give the older skin to the King. Deer skin, mruga-carma, is used as an Asana for meditation. The older skin is used by rishi-s has great powers as rishi-s has used it for their own tapas. Kings use this powerful skin for the good of all.

    Some Hindu-s eat meat, but it is not encouraged. In West Bengal, for 6 months it remains flooded, so you cant sow any seeds, hence no crops can be grown. So they eat fish and consider it as non-veg. In the same way, certain lands are not fertile, hence people are forced to eat non-veg, for survival, hence they eat meat. Maharashtrians (people living on Maharashtra state) also eat meat.

    As one progresses spiritually, it is advised to become vegetarians.
     
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  15. Shantanu

    Shantanu Well-Known Member

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    To be a Hindu you need to study the Vedas and adopt a varna (from Brahmin, Kshatriya, Vaishya and Shudra) that you are comfortable in.
     
  16. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    It is not because of Abrahamic religions that Hinduism was 'organized' (in various darshanas, philosophies and sects). It was always like that from time immemorial. Charvak, hjivakas, Buddhism, Jainis and Sikhism are examples, there are many more. It was non-suppression of individual views. That is why you and me, both atheists, are still Hindu.
     
  17. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    A definite no. You have to follow 'dharma' (fulfill your familial and national responsibilities and engage in righteous action). To be a nice person. That is all that is essential, the rest, according to your choice.
     
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  18. LuisDantas

    LuisDantas Aura of atheification
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    Fair enough, but wasn't the question specifically about how to become a Hindu?
     
  19. Vinayaka

    Vinayaka devotee
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    Aup was answering Shantanu, and the fact of the matter is opinions vary. Of the several thousand Hindus I've met over the past 40 years, only 3 people told my I was out of place, and one of those guys wasn't even a Hindu. The vast majority of Hindus accept converts, and walk alongside them in dharma.
     
  20. Shantanu

    Shantanu Well-Known Member

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    Aup, is there no difference in the dharma performed by Barack Obama and David Cameron who see themselves as fulfilling their familial and national responsibilities and engaging in righteous actions and the dharma that is required to be performed by a Hindu person?
     
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