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California burger flippers are soon to be making 20 bucks an hour under minimum wage law.

Nakosis

Non-Binary Physicalist
Premium Member
The problem with such legislation is that lawmakers
take this same view, ie, that it's a simplistic philosophical
argument. It imagines the desired consequences, but it
it's not based upon analysis of the range of real world
consequences.
- How many jobs will be replaced due to increased
pressure to automate?
- How much will prices rise?
- What will be the effect of higher prices?
- Will the market contract, leading to job loss.

Economics is very dynamic and to claim singular causality is naive.
Though it is the governments job to control inflation politicians can use their positions to manipulate public opinion about themselves through compassion policies. Just another dynamic feeding the whole of economics.

Best really to not be dependent on governmental compassion policy for one's own well being.

Keeping people dependent benefits the politicians. Doesn't really benefit "the people" as much encouraging/supporting independence.
 

SkepticThinker

Veteran Member
Do they really think raising the minimum wage is gonna help those impoverished? Most poor households are impoverished because nobody is working; not because everybody is working minimum wage.
It's both. Including people working full time who still can't make ends meet.
 

SkepticThinker

Veteran Member
I was asking that myself.

No doubt it would create a ripple effect that makes it far more expensive than they are letting out.

It's like a manager who makes 20 bucks an hour and now when a employee makes 20 bucks an hour , that manager is going to want more himself. Probably 30 bucks an hour, so now instead of raising a worker's wage you're now going to have to raise both a worker's wage and a manager's wage together so you can see where that leads to.
Good.
 

Twilight Hue

Twilight, not bright nor dark, good nor bad.
I'm always happy when workers actually make enough money to live, afford housing and buy food.
People shouldn't be working 40 hour weeks without making enough to survive and support themselves. That's ludicrous.
Me too. Let's just hope the extra money isn't eaten up by higher prices and more/higher taxes.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber
The problem with such legislation is that lawmakers
take this same view, ie, that it's a simplistic philosophical
argument. It imagines the desired consequences, but it
it's not based upon analysis of the range of real world
consequences.
- How many jobs will be replaced due to increased
pressure to automate?
- How much will prices rise?
- What will be the effect of higher prices?
- Will the market contract, leading to job loss.
Good thing we have a world full of results and answers so we don't have to shoot blindfolded.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber
I was asking that myself.

No doubt it would create a ripple effect that makes it far more expensive than they are letting out.

It's like a manager who makes 20 bucks an hour and now when a employee makes 20 bucks an hour , that manager is going to want more himself. Probably 30 bucks an hour, so now instead of raising a worker's wage you're now going to have to raise both a worker's wage and a manager's wage together so you can see where that leads to.
I fail to see a problem. It's letting more people afford to live, especially in a world where part time employment has become more common.
 

Twilight Hue

Twilight, not bright nor dark, good nor bad.
I fail to see a problem. It's letting more people afford to live, especially in a world where part time employment has become more common.
Maybe a good common sense idea would be to actually lower prices of goods and services negating any wage hike instead of gouging people year after year and ending up having to deal with 20 an hour wages in the first place. But that's just me.
 

Pogo

Active Member
Maybe a good common sense idea would be to actually lower prices of goods and services negating any wage hike instead of gouging people year after year and ending up having to deal with 20 an hour wages in the first place. But that's just me.
If we did that, we would have less money for the CEOs and you know that won't happen.
 

esmith

Veteran Member
I fail to see a problem. It's letting more people afford to live, especially in a world where part time employment has become more common.
If a company can't not make a profit with this law they will eather automate, close their businesses, or move out of state.
Then where will the "more people" find any job? That is one they are willing to take.
 

Pogo

Active Member
If a company can't not make a profit with this law they will eather automate, close their businesses, or move out of state.
Then where will the "more people" find any job? That is one they are willing to take.
From the new company that replaces the lost one since the demand hasn't gone away.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber
If a company can't not make a profit with this law they will eather automate, close their businesses, or move out of state.
Then where will the "more people" find any job? That is one they are willing to take.
Those companies are making profits, along with runaway executive pay amd bonuses that have skyrocketed their income over the oast several decades while everybody else has stagnated.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber
Maybe a good common sense idea would be to actually lower prices of goods and services negating any wage hike instead of gouging people year after year and ending up having to deal with 20 an hour wages in the first place. But that's just me.
Without extensive and very heavy market intervention prices won't go down. And they shouldn't go down. Our artificially low prices have caused enough destruction as it is. It's high time we all pay up, including consumers (who are going to have to pay fair costs for fair businesses) and employers (who are going to have to pay more and end tax payers subsidizing low wages).
 

Revoltingest

Pragmatic Libertarian
Premium Member
Looking at various charts of what the 1 percent now has taken for themselves and what everyone else has is inconceivable and unconscionable to the point it completely takes one's breath away.
Do you believe that the 1% own
the individual fast food joints?
 
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