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Ask me about ancient Egypt

Tamino

Active Member
Oh who's this? Firon was a tyrannical pharaoh from where? Do you know anything about Firon?
I suspect that "firon" is a transcription of فرعون - the "name" or the Egyptian king in the Qur'an. But I don't think that this is a name, it's just an Arabic variation of the word "pharaoh"

And what is this: The Valley of the Whales

an article by Lara Iskander

Quote by Lara Iskander: Today, the area is occupied by numerous excavation sites of whales, sharks, petrified mangrove bushes, a wide variety of fossil plants and various other remains of the prehistoric sea. One is bound to come across petrified corals, shark teeth and fossil remains scattered all over the valley.

My @River Sea question is: So by the time people lived in KMT, there were no whales or sharks to eat. What happened to the water, and did the lack of water cause red and black soil?
The water disappeared millions of years before humans even existed. You can check the Thetis ocean and the geological history of the Sahara desert if you want to know more details.
The "red" of the red land is kind of related to that ancient ocean: the reddish colour of the desert cliffs is mostly weathered limestone, and limestone is a sedimentary rock deposited in oceans and coastal environments.
The black soil is the silt deposited by the modern river.
In short: both the red and the black soil of Egypt are related to water. (Matching the Egyptian creation myth, since all comes from Nun, the primordial ocean)

What foods did they eat then at KMT?
Not sharks and whales.
I don't know, do you want an overview of the main crops and food sources in Egyptian history?
The first people living in the area we're hunter-gatherers, by the way.
 

Brickjectivity

wind and rain touch not this brain
Staff member
Premium Member
I'm a Kemetic pagan who discovered the religion while studying Egyptology.
If you want to know anything about current developments in the field of Egyptology, ancient source texts, a specific deity... I may not be able to answer every question, but I can probably look it up or point out the relevant books and papers.
Also, if you just want something translated from or into hieroglyphs: My Middle Egyptian is pretty solid, just don't ask me about participle constructions.
The Greek pantheon appears to arrange the deities in such a way as to explain where things come from. For example the god of sleep descends from the goddess of the night . Do Egyptian deities have a similar arrangement?

Here's a link to wikipedia illustrating what I am talking about:
Code:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_tree_of_the_Greek_gods
 

Tamino

Active Member
The Greek pantheon appears to arrange the deities in such a way as to explain where things come from. For example the god of sleep descends from the goddess of the night .
I would even doubt such a system in Greek mythology, but I am no expert there. However, it seems to me like those family trees and parent/child relationships are often secondary associations.
As in: different deities and concepts already existed in a religion, and then someone sits down and tries to sort them into a coherent system. I suspect that this is what Hesiod was doing.

Do Egyptian deities have a similar arrangement?
No... or only similar in some basic aspects.
There are, of course, stories that explain where things come from. How was the world created? Why don't the gods live with us on earth? Why does the sun change its position in Winter? Etc.
But they are all single stories looking at certain aspects of the world.

Egyptian religion was incredibly local. Each town and region had their own major gods, and often their own mythology. Egypt famously has several creation myths, not just one - any attempt at a single, coherent family tree is doomed by that alone.
There are some smaller "systems". The Heliopolitan Ennead is a family tree (but it already gets ambiguous when we come to the position of Haroeris).
There's the Ogdoad of primordial principles, and of course the various triads. But all of those were restricted to a local cult center and never encompassed all gods.. not even all the major ones.

There were lists trying to sort out the deities, like the nome lists on temples, but those sort the gods by location, not by function or family.

I think there were some attempts to create a universal system, like the sun cult in the Ramesside era. Or the Shabaka stone. But those were intellectual exercises of some scholars, I think... the religion and cult practice, as a whole, remained diverse and chaotic.
 
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Brickjectivity

wind and rain touch not this brain
Staff member
Premium Member
I would even doubt such a system in Greek mythology, but I am no expert there. However, it seems to me like those family trees and parent/child relationships are often secondary associations.
As in: different deities and concepts already existed in a religion, and then someone sits down and tries to sort them into a coherent system. I suspect that this is what Hesiod was doing.


No... or only similar in some basic aspects.
There are, of course, stories that explain where things come from. How was the world created? Why don't the gods live with us on earth? Why does the sun change its position in Winter? Etc.
But they are all single stories looking at certain aspects of the world.

Egyptian religion was incredibly local. Each town and region had their own major gods, and often their own mythology. Egypt famously has several creation myths, not just one - any attempt at a single, coherent family tree is doomed by that alone.
There are some smaller "systems". The Heliopolitan Ennead is a family tree (but it already gets ambiguous when we come to the position of Haroeris).
There's the Ogdoad of primordial principles, and of course the various triads. But all of those were restricted to a local cult center and never encompassed all gods.. not even all the major ones.

There were lists trying to sort out the deities, like the nome lists on temples, but those sort the gods by location, not by function or family.

I think there were some attempts to create a universal system, like the sun cult in the Ramesside era. Or the Shabaka stone. But those were intellectual exercises of some scholars, I think... the religion and cult practice, as a whole, remained diverse and chaotic.
Thank you for that reply! I am no Historian, amateur or otherwise; but I am led to believe the Greeks are much influenced by Egypt, that much we consider to be Greek begins in Egypt. For example ancient Greek medicine is almost entirely copied from Egypt. This goes back to early times, before the Ptolemies. Seeing how one culture implements the technology and ideas of another culture is interesting. I don't know, but I wonder how this affects us in modern times. Old patterns stick around. You have probably heard about the width of modern train tracks inherited from the ruts made by Roman chariot wheels. That is related to why I asked the question. It seems to me that things make copies of themselves, first by imprinting; and then that imprint becomes the mold for something else. Anything that exists tends to make copies of itself whether it be DNA or a simple shape in the sand, and there is a bit of luck involved. So I am only tangentially interested in Egypt itself, but I value your reply.
 

Tamino

Active Member
Thank you for that reply! I am no Historian, amateur or otherwise; but I am led to believe the Greeks are much influenced by Egypt, that much we consider to be Greek begins in Egypt.
I agree. The Mediterranean area is very much interconnected in trade and culture since the Bronze Age at least.
But I also wouldn't over-emphasize it. Greek culture has its own unique developments as well

Seeing how one culture implements the technology and ideas of another culture is interesting. I don't know, but I wonder how this affects us in modern times.
Absolutely. I am interested in history because I want to figure out what's inherited, and what changes, and what is just common human nature.
I am pretty much convinced by now that human cultures have both homologous and analogous elements: some things are similar, because they share a common source. Like Greek, Roman and medieval Arabic medicine. Others are similar because they have a similar function and physical/environmental conditions, like Maya and Egyptian pyramids.
Old patterns stick around. You have probably heard about the width of modern train tracks inherited from the ruts made by Roman chariot wheels.
I have. It's super cool.
That is related to why I asked the question. It seems to me that things make copies of themselves, first by imprinting; and then that imprint becomes the mold for something else.
Good point. I find that 5000 years of "civilization" are actually not such a long time, compared to evolution or geology. Technology can change super fast, but culture sticks around. Ideas of ethics, religion, gender roles, hierarchy... those are dug deep into our brains. Not necessarily a good thing... but interesting.
 

River Sea

Active Member
The water disappeared millions of years before humans even existed. You can check the Thetis ocean and the geological history of the Sahara desert if you want to know more details.
The "red" of the red land is kind of related to that ancient ocean: the reddish colour of the desert cliffs is mostly weathered limestone, and limestone is a sedimentary rock deposited in oceans and coastal environments.
The black soil is the silt deposited by the modern river.
In short: both the red and the black soil of Egypt are related to water. (Matching the Egyptian creation myth, since all comes from Nun, the primordial ocean)

@Bthoth @Tamino So did Egyptians believe in evolution, creators, or both?

@Tamino You wrote: The water disappeared millions of years before humans even existed. I re-read the article, and you are right about millions of years ago. I also see Lara Iskander explain that the basin of Wadi Hitan was submerged in water some 40 to 50 million years ago.

Quote Lara Iskander
There is considerable evidence which indicates that the basin of Wadi Hitan was submerged in water some 40 to 50 million years ago. At that time, the so-called Tethys Sea reached far south of the existing Mediterranean. The Tethys Sea is assumed to have retreated north and over the years deposited thick sediments of sandstone and limestone visible in rock formations in Wadi Hitan. The Valley of the Whales

Due to either forgetting what nun means or not knowing what nun means (many times I forget things), I looked up what nun means. I do remember what Ra means, Ra means sun. Nun water came from Ra.

Nun​

Egyptian god
Also known as: Nu
The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
Nun, oldest of the ancient Egyptian gods and father of Re, the sun god. Nun’s name means “primeval waters,” and he represented the waters of chaos out of which Re-Atum began creation.


The sun god Re (Ra), one of the creator gods of ancient Egypt. (more). Re, in ancient Egyptian religion, god of the sun and creator god. Re | Description, Meaning, & Facts

@Tamino @Bthoth

Let's see if I can write using the words nun or nu, Re is also Ra

@River Sea writes: Sun is the father who's RA or RE. Water comes from in light Re. I read online that Because Nun’s name means “primeval waters,” and represented the waters of chaos out of which Re-Atum began creation.

I'll need to look up Atum. Shall I do that now.
Re
Egyptian god
Also known as: Atum-Re, Chnum-Re, Pra, Ra, Re-Atum (look at all these names)

@River Sea copy past from Re | Description, Meaning, & Facts

What is Re the god of?​

What is Re's origin?​

Who is Re related to?​


Re
Re
The sun god Re (Ra), one of the creator gods of ancient Egypt.
Re, in ancient Egyptian religion, god of the sun and creator god. He was believed to travel across the sky in his solar bark and, during the night, to make his passage in another bark through the underworld, where, in order to be born again for the new day, he had to vanquish the evil serpent Apopis (Apepi). As one of the creator gods, he rose from the ocean of chaos on the primeval hill, creating himself and then in turn engendering eight other gods.

So did Egyptians believe in evolution, creators, or both?
 

Tamino

Active Member
So did Egyptians believe in evolution, creators, or both?
Creators. No scientific theory of evolution is known from ancient Egypt
Quote Lara Iskander
There is considerable evidence which indicates that the basin of Wadi Hitan was submerged in water some 40 to 50 million years ago. At that time, the so-called Tethys Sea reached far south of the existing Mediterranean. The Tethys Sea is assumed to have retreated north and over the years deposited thick sediments of sandstone and limestone visible in rock formations in Wadi Hitan.
Yes, that's geology. Are you surprised?

I do remember what Ra means, Ra means sun. Nun water came from Ra.
Not exactly. In most myths, Nun pre-existed before the creator god

Nun​

Egyptian god
Also known as: Nu
The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
Nun, oldest of the ancient Egyptian gods and father of Re, the sun god. Nun’s name means “primeval waters,” and he represented the waters of chaos out of which Re-Atum began creation.
"Father of" more in the sense of being his elder. Though the Book of the Celestial Cow does address Nun as Father of Ra.

@River Sea writes: Sun is the father who's RA or RE. Water comes from in light Re.
No, primeval waters existed earlier than light

I read online that Because Nun’s name means “primeval waters,” and represented the waters of chaos out of which Re-Atum began creation.
True.

I'll need to look up Atum. Shall I do that now.
Have fun! I recommend this one:

Re
Egyptian god
Also known as: Atum-Re, Chnum-Re, Pra, Ra, Re-Atum (look at all these names)
Those names are syncretisms with other deities, not exactly the same thing .
Only exception is "Pra", that's a Late Egyptian form which includes the article 'pa Ra' = 'the Ra' = Pra
Re
Re
The sun god Re (Ra), one of the creator gods of ancient Egypt.
Re, in ancient Egyptian religion, god of the sun and creator god. He was believed to travel across the sky in his solar bark and, during the night, to make his passage in another bark through the underworld, where, in order to be born again for the new day, he had to vanquish the evil serpent Apopis (Apepi). As one of the creator gods, he rose from the ocean of chaos on the primeval hill, creating himself and then in turn engendering eight other gods.
That's a pretty accurate summary.
I'd like to qualify one point: Ra rarely fights A/pep himself, he usually has gods and goddesses that fight for him.
So did Egyptians believe in evolution, creators, or both?
Creators. Though they probably didn't believe in their mythology as being fact... Their texts show that they had a keen understanding of metaphor and allegory.
 

River Sea

Active Member
Krishna? little blue guy? With the 16,000 wives?
This is made up of the fact that Krishna had over 16,000 wives. You don't believe this, do you? If you do, how did you believe this?

What does this story even mean about Krishna having over 16,000 wives?

Online explains: Although Lord Krishna had 16108 wives, he is believed to have treated them all equally and with respect

How?

I'll edit this and make this shorter because I found the answer Parvati.

Oh I found the answer: Parvati, the Indian Goddess of Fertility and Love

So Parvati is similar to Hathor?



Lord Sri Krsna
Marries 16,108 Wives
Why So Many?

Quote from website further down
Another, more mundane reason, however, still a social religous principle (dharma) is because He was able to protect so many women, and these women needed such protection.

Question: were there any similar past people in KMT who had 16108 wives for this same reason because women needed such protection?

Do the people from KMT also understand Dharma? If so, what would that be called?

@Bthoth do you think Egyptians are into creators, evolution, or both? @Tamino thinks creators.

@Tamino claims creators. No scientific theory of evolution is known from ancient Egypt.

Creators. No scientific theory of evolution is known from ancient Egypt

So who helped Krishna's many wives as a midwife, what was her name as a Goddess? the answer: Parvati

I'll add more from website 31 Fertility Goddesses from Around the World


First Egyptian here's a bat., then I'll show from India.

BAT, THE ANCIENT EGYPTIAN GODDESS OF FERTILITY AND SUCCESS​

Bat is the Ancient Egyptian cow goddess of fertility and success. Records of Bat date back to the early Predynastic Period (c. 6000-3150 BCE), making her one of the oldest known Egyptian goddesses. She was frequently depicted as a woman with cow ears and horns. Bat was believed to be relevant to people’s success, having the ability to see both the future and the past. Bat was absorbed by Hathor (Ancient Egyptian goddess of fertility, motherhood, and agriculture) who adopted her physical and spiritual characteristics.

1709487500635.png


Oh I found the answer: Parvati, the Indian Goddess of Fertility and Love

Parvati is the answer


So Parvati is similar to Hathor?


PARVATI, THE INDIAN GODDESS OF FERTILITY AND LOVE
Parvati is the Indian goddess of fertility, love, and devotion. In Hinduism, she is recognized as the mother goddess. She plays a role in the trinity of Hindu goddesses, along with Lakshmi (goddess of wealth and prosperity) and Saraswati (goddess of knowledge and learning).

1709488190784.png

Parvati as a two-armed consort goddess of Shiva, 11th Century Sculpture from the British Museum
 
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Bharat Jhunjhunwala

TruthPrevails
Krishn
This is made up of the fact that Krishna had over 16,000 wives. You don't believe this, do you? If you do, how did you believe this?

What does this story even mean about Krishna having over 16,000 wives?

I'll edit this and make this shorter because I found the answer Parvati.

Oh I found the answer: Parvati, the Indian Goddess of Fertility and Love

So Parvati is similar to Hathor?



Lord Sri Krsna
Marries 16,108 Wives
Why So Many?

Quote from website further down
Another, more mundane reason, however, still a social religous principle (dharma) is because He was able to protect so many women, and these women needed such protection.

Question: were there any similar past people in KMT who had 16108 wives for this same reason because women needed such protection?

Do the people from KMT also understand Dharma? If so, what would that be called?

@Bthoth do you think Egyptians are into creators, evolution, or both? @Tamino thinks creators.

@Tamino claims creators. No scientific theory of evolution is known from ancient Egypt.



So who helped Krishna's many wives as a midwife, what was her name as a Goddess? the answer: Parvati

I'll add more from website 31 Fertility Goddesses from Around the World


First Egyptian here's a bat., then I'll show from India.

BAT, THE ANCIENT EGYPTIAN GODDESS OF FERTILITY AND SUCCESS​

Bat is the Ancient Egyptian cow goddess of fertility and success. Records of Bat date back to the early Predynastic Period (c. 6000-3150 BCE), making her one of the oldest known Egyptian goddesses. She was frequently depicted as a woman with cow ears and horns. Bat was believed to be relevant to people’s success, having the ability to see both the future and the past. Bat was absorbed by Hathor (Ancient Egyptian goddess of fertility, motherhood, and agriculture) who adopted her physical and spiritual characteristics.

View attachment 89026

Oh I found the answer: Parvati, the Indian Goddess of Fertility and Love

Parvati is the answer


So Parvati is similar to Hathor?


PARVATI, THE INDIAN GODDESS OF FERTILITY AND LOVE
Parvati is the Indian goddess of fertility, love, and devotion. In Hinduism, she is recognized as the mother goddess. She plays a role in the trinity of Hindu goddesses, along with Lakshmi (goddess of wealth and prosperity) and Saraswati (goddess of knowledge and learning).

View attachment 89027
Parvati as a two-armed consort goddess of Shiva, 11th Century Sculpture from the British Museu
Krishna had liberated large numbers of women from a tyrants prison. They asked, who will adopt us? Then krishna said I will adopt you and ensure your welfare. That is how he got 16000 wifes. And it is likely to be an hyperbole. I do not remember having read this in any authoritative text.
 

Tamino

Active Member
Oh I found the answer: Parvati, the Indian Goddess of Fertility and Love

So Parvati is similar to Hathor?
In general terms? Yes sure. They share some attributes.
Their specific personality and mythology is different, though.
Question: were there any similar past people in KMT who had 16108 wives for this same reason because women needed such protection?
No.
The king potentially had numerous wives, but that was for reasons of status and diplomacy. And 16000 is far too extreme a number.

Egyptian women may have gotten married due to social expectation or economical reasons sometimes, but they didn't technically need a husband for protection. They could have their own wealth, work their own trade and appeal to a court if they felt threatened or mistreated.
Do the people from KMT also understand Dharma? If so, what would that be called?
It would be called Maat, but it's not exactly the same thing.
First Egyptian here's a bat., then I'll show from India.

BAT, THE ANCIENT EGYPTIAN GODDESS OF FERTILITY AND SUCCESS​

Bat is the Ancient Egyptian cow goddess of fertility and success. Records of Bat date back to the early Predynastic Period (c. 6000-3150 BCE), making her one of the oldest known Egyptian goddesses. She was frequently depicted as a woman with cow ears and horns. Bat was believed to be relevant to people’s success, having the ability to see both the future and the past. Bat was absorbed by Hathor (Ancient Egyptian goddess of fertility, motherhood, and agriculture) who adopted her physical and spiritual characteristics.

View attachment 89026
Bat is pretty cool. She's depicted on the Narmer palette.
 

Tamino

Active Member
@Tamino . The highest god of egypt is Ra or Sun? Is there any equivalent to Elohim?
Not exactly. There is no single highest deity. It always depends on the time and context.

Ra might be named as the king of God's most often, but in their own times and temples, others take precedence.

For example: Min, Neith, and Horus were probably the highest gods in the pre-Dynastic. The sun cult only gained overarching importance in the 4th dynasty.
In the Middle Kingdom, Amun became a serious contender, and then got syncretized with Ra.
In the New Kingdom, a number of creator and solar deities were merged into an overarching king of gods. If you read Ramesside hymns like the Cairene hymn to Amun, you find Amun addressed as a solar deity and by the names Atum and Horakhte. Other texts pull Ptah into the mix as well.
Also from the New Kingdom, the "Contendings of Horus and Seth" address Neith as a wise mother and ask her for advice, and later in the same story Osiris asserts his power as ruler of the Netherworld demons.

You could even say that in Egypt, the highest deity is whoever you address as such. Their personhood is fluid, their hierarchy is situational.
You can walk into a tiny rock-cut desert shrine of Hathor as Lady of the West, and address Her as "Mistress of all the Gods". And then you can return to the city, watch Mut's barque pass in procession, and pray to her as queen and mother of all.

And the El? As creator and king, but not clearly a solar deity, he might have similarities to Atum or Amun. And he even sometimes wears the Atef-crown, a direct reference to Osiris.
There are lots of connections between the Egyptian and the Levantine Pantheons in the late Bronze Age. Astarte, Anat and Reshef were integrated into Egypt, and Hathor had big temples in the Sinai and Palestine/Israel
 

Tamino

Active Member
@Bharat Jhunjhunwala @Tamino

People can become doctors of Egypt as Egyptologists, but not doctors of any other countries or areas of land? How come?
Pick one, they're all correct:

Answer A)
Egypt is just such a special place and culture that it's worth dedicating an entire field of study to it

Answer B)
Following Napoleon's imperialistic invasion, there was so much fancy loot available that the rich white dudes made it a full-time occupation

Answer C)
You obviously don't know about all the doctors of Assyrology, Sinology, Archaeology of the British Isles and any number of other specialized fields of study
 

Bharat Jhunjhunwala

TruthPrevails
Not exactly. There is no single highest deity. It always depends on the time and context.

Ra might be named as the king of God's most often, but in their own times and temples, others take precedence.

For example: Min, Neith, and Horus were probably the highest gods in the pre-Dynastic. The sun cult only gained overarching importance in the 4th dynasty.
In the Middle Kingdom, Amun became a serious contender, and then got syncretized with Ra.
In the New Kingdom, a number of creator and solar deities were merged into an overarching king of gods. If you read Ramesside hymns like the Cairene hymn to Amun, you find Amun addressed as a solar deity and by the names Atum and Horakhte. Other texts pull Ptah into the mix as well.
Also from the New Kingdom, the "Contendings of Horus and Seth" address Neith as a wise mother and ask her for advice, and later in the same story Osiris asserts his power as ruler of the Netherworld demons.

You could even say that in Egypt, the highest deity is whoever you address as such. Their personhood is fluid, their hierarchy is situational.
You can walk into a tiny rock-cut desert shrine of Hathor as Lady of the West, and address Her as "Mistress of all the Gods". And then you can return to the city, watch Mut's barque pass in procession, and pray to her as queen and mother of all.

And the El? As creator and king, but not clearly a solar deity, he might have similarities to Atum or Amun. And he even sometimes wears the Atef-crown, a direct reference to Osiris.
There are lots of connections between the Egyptian and the Levantine Pantheons in the late Bronze Age. Astarte, Anat and Reshef were integrated into Egypt, and Hathor had big temples in the Sinai and Palestine/Israel
Thanks for the info. Do you know of any comparison with the hindu pantheon? A comparative study would show whether there is more similarity with mid.east or Indus valley.
 

River Sea

Active Member
Pick one, they're all correct:

Answer A)
Egypt is just such a special place and culture that it's worth dedicating an entire field of study to it

Answer B)
Following Napoleon's imperialistic invasion, there was so much fancy loot available that the rich white dudes made it a full-time occupation

Answer C)
You obviously don't know about all the doctors of Assyrology, Sinology, Archaeology of the British Isles and any number of other specialized fields of study

This is to my question
People can become doctors of Egypt as Egyptologists, but not doctors of any other countries or areas of land? How come?

I now see how my quote makes no sense because I'm claiming people can't when they can. However, oddly, I was wondering about this. However, after I went to Google, I learned that people can be doctors in other areas of land besides Egypt.

I went to Google to help me and found the answer is yes, people can be doctors and study other areas of land besides Egypt.

@Bharat Jhunjhunwala @Tamino

To show you what I learn from Google.

I google search and found word Indology (the study of Indian history, literature, philosophy, and culture.)

can a person be a doctor Indologist
can a person be a doctor Egyptologist
can a person be a doctor Assyriology Assyriologist
can a person be a doctor sinologist?

those words Assyriology and Sinologist I saw what you wrote @Tamino
I google search
Do Egyptologists make a lot of money?
Salary Ranges for Egyptologist

The salaries of Egyptologists in The US range from $45,411 to $407,467, and the average is $100,852.

I google search
How do you become an Assyriologist?
Under ordinary circumstances, the following courses are required in Years 1 through 3 of the Assyriology and Sumerology program: Twenty-seven courses, including at least fifteen courses in Akkadian and Sumerian (with a minimum of five courses in Sumerian), and at least three approved survey courses in the history,

@Bharat Jhunjhunwala you study Indology then. could you also use word Assyriology too?

Assyriology, also known as Cuneiform studies or Ancient Near East studies,

KARA COONEY EGYPTOLOGIST She is a doctor Egyptologist. Not a doctor Assyriologist and not a doctor in Chinese which is a Sinology, am I understanding correctly?

Si·nol·o·gy
/sīˈnäləjē/
noun
the study of Chinese language, history, customs, and politics.

Dr. Falk is a doctor Egyptologist

Basically my question was, could people be doctors that then shows what area of land they're a doctor studying of, I went to google to help me with this.

And the answer is yes

I google search this

I think I'll google search first next time before asking questions.
 

River Sea

Active Member
Manu's twin, Yemo became Ymir in Norse mythology and Yama in Hinduism/Buddhism.

Manu Indus Valley, KMT, and where else? What is a twin, compared to a past story that continues?


@Bharat Jhunjhunwala @Tamino
Have you heard of Manu's twin?

From the name of the sacrificed First King *Yemo ("Twin") derive the Indic Yama, god of death and the underworld; the Avestan Yima, king of the golden age and guardian of hell; the Norse Ymir (from PGmc *Jumijaz), ancestor of the giants (jötnar); and most likely Remus (from Proto-Latin *Yemos or *Yemonos, with the ...

*Manu and *Yemo - Wikipedia


Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › *Manu_and_*Yemo

Manu Indus Valley, KMT and where else?
 
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River Sea

Active Member
@Tamino I'll ask here.
How come the Egyptians think a person is at risk of the after life if their physical body is burned into ashes? I don't know how to ask these questions: what, why, how come at risk, how come? can you explain more about burial rites to make the transformation into an Osiris, how come need to keep an eye on descendants.

So what if a corpse is incomplete - you can use magical substitutes or a Ka-statue instead.

To make a Ka statue, you need an opening-of-the-mouth. The original ritual is known, but it's super long and complicated. I have never tried that yet.

Because Kemetic religion is an animist tradition that sees the spiritual tightly woven into the natural world. We don't have this platonist distinction of spirit and matter, we don't see the material world as lower or imperfect.

The ancient people would probably be horrified. Burning your body risks the afterlife, you need the burial rites to make the transformation into an Osiris. And it cuts the connection to the living world that you need to receive offerings and keep an eye on your descendants.
Me, I plan to get cremated myself. As I said, I think a Ka statue is a perfectly fine substitute for a mummy.


Ka stature.

Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ka_statue




ka statue from en.wikipedia.org
A ka statue is a type of ancient Egyptian statue intended to provide a resting place for the ka (life-force or spirit) of the person after death.
 
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Bharat Jhunjhunwala

TruthPrevails
It says "tawy" -the two lands. That's literally the most common word with which the Egyptians referred to their own country.
Also, you are still ignoring that the sun god in his form of an "old man" represents the evening sun.
And have you considered my points about the phonetics above? There's absolutely no certainty that the Egyptian word was even pronounced anything close to "mah-noo"
I don't know enough to respond. But it seems to me that the direct evidence of land of manu in the east cannot be canceled by such indirect evidences. The problem is that the Egyptologists are so fixed in their conventional mindset that they cannot even imagine mitsrayim in india. That said you are beacon light willing to engage.
 
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