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A question of doctrine

Discussion in 'Latter-day Saints DIR' started by Halcyon, Nov 26, 2005.

  1. Halcyon

    Halcyon Lord of the Badgers

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    How does the LDS church reconcile the difference between its teaching and practice of eternal marriage, and Jesus's contradictory teaching in the gospels?

    Reference: Mark 11.24-25
     
  2. jonny

    jonny Well-Known Member

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    We just ignore the Bible. :)

    Just kidding, I think your reference may be wrong because that one doesn't mention marriage. The one the people usually use is Matt 22:30. I already had my opinion on the matter, but I did a quick search on it to see what "the experts" say. I found an article at fairlds.org which made a few points.

    The phrase that people are not "given in marriage" in Matt, Mark, and Luke is translated from the same Greek phrase in all thee gospels. This phrase itself does not contradict LDS doctrine because we don't believe that people can marry after the resurrection. At the resurrection it would be too late. If people have not entered into the covenant of marriage under the authority of the priesthood they will not be married in the next life. In the hypothetical situation Christ was presented with I assume that the woman was not sealed to any of the men.

    http://www.fairlds.org/apol/brochures/EternalMarriage.pdf
     
  3. Katzpur

    Katzpur Not your average Mormon

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    Hi, Halcyon.

    I think you're refering to Mark 12, not Mark 11. How's that for (1)mind reading (2)knowing my scriptures?

    I addressed this question in a post awhile back, so I'm copying my previous answer. I believe that these verses are among the most universally misunderstood of any in the New Testament. At first glance, they do appear to be saying that marriage does not survive the grave. But for those willing to look a little deeper, there are some significant clues which imply that the truth is a bit more involved. Mark and Luke both relate this same incident, but with some slightly different details, so I'm quoting both of them.

    Mark 12:18-25 “Then come unto him the Sadducees, which say there is no resurrection; and they asked him, saying, Master, Moses wrote unto us, If a man's brother die, and leave his wife behind him, and leave no children, that his brother should take his wife, and raise up seed unto his brother. Now there were seven brethren: and the first took a wife, and dying left no seed. And the second took her, and died, neither left he any seed: and the third likewise. And the seven had her, and left no seed: last of all the woman died also. In the resurrection therefore, when they shall rise, whose wife shall she be of them? for the seven had her to wife. And Jesus answering said unto them, Do ye not therefore err, because ye know not the scriptures, neither the power of God? For when they shall rise from the dead, they neither marry, nor are given in marriage; but are as the angels which are in heaven.”

    Luke 20:27-36: “Then came to him certain of the Sadducees, which deny that there is any resurrection; and they asked him, Saying, Master, Moses wrote unto us, If any man's brother die, having a wife, and he die without children, that his brother should take his wife, and raise up seed unto his brother. There were therefore seven brethren: and the first took a wife, and died without children. And the second took her to wife, and he died childless. And the third took her; and in like manner the seven also: and they left no children, and died. Last of all the woman died also. Therefore in the resurrection whose wife of them is she? for seven had her to wife. And Jesus answering said unto them, The children of this world marry, and are given in marriage: But they which shall be accounted worthy to obtain that world, and the resurrection from the dead, neither marry, nor are given in marriage: Neither can they die any more: for they are equal unto the angels; and are the children of God, being the children of the resurrection.”


    I would also post the entire text of John 17, because it is very important to an accurate understanding of these passages on marriage, but that would make what will already be a pretty long post even longer. You may, however, wish to review that chapter yourself. Anyway, here are my thoughts on the subject:

    1. We need, as always, to be aware of who Jesus’ audience was. In this instance, He was speaking to the Sadducees. What do we know about the Sadducees? First of all, they didn’t believe in a resurrection at all. In asking a question of this sort, do you honestly think they were looking for the truth? Or do you think that, as on many other occasions, they were simply trying to stump Jesus by asking a question that would cause Him to have to contradict something He’d previously taught. It’s entirely logical to assume that Jesus, knowing their hearts as perfectly as He did, would have given them an answer that, while entirely honest, would pertain to them specifically. In teaching a truly receptive audience, His answer would likely have been expressed somewhat differently.

    2. John 17 (which I referred to earlier) makes frequent use of the phrases “of the world” and “not of the world.” These phrases are, in fact, used so many times that it’s almost impossible to brush them off as inconsequential. In the prayer recorded in this chapter, Jesus made a clear distinction between His followers, in other words, those individuals who, like Him, were “not of this world,” and those who rejected Him, thereby falling into the group who were “of the world.”

    In Luke’s account of this event, Jesus once again uses the phrase, “of the world.” Jesus was telling the Sadducees, who were obviously “children of the world” what they could expect in the next life. Because they were not His followers, they would not receive the blessings of eternal marriage, but would instead be as angels. Jesus did not explain to them the blessings that the children “not of this world” would receive. Why should He have done? They would have believed Him to exactly the same extent that they believed they would be resurrected.

    3. Looking at Mark’s account, we see another important indication of what Jesus really meant. Here, Jesus is recorded as having said, “Ye know not the power of God.” What on earth could He have meant by that? The power of God to do what – un-marry someone? In the context of His statement, He could only have meant that the Sadducees did not understand that God has the power to unite a husband and wife forever. Without such power, death would certainly end the marriage covenant, but with it, the covenant is eternal. Jesus gave Peter the keys to bind in heaven that which he would bind on earth. Having that authority, he would be able to exercise the power of God to make the marriage relationship endure. We know from the Old Testament that “whatsoever God doeth, it shall be forever.” When Peter received the keys to the kingdom of God, he received the power of God to do something that would have eternal significance.

    4. Finally, it is significant that Jesus never did say that no one would be married in Heaven. He merely said that no one would get married in Heaven. There is a difference between these two things. The Greek word translated as “marry” is “gamosin,” the third-person form of the verb “gameo,” which means “to enter into the marriage state or to get married.” The term “gamizonai” (“giving in marriage”) is another way of saying the same thing. But, He never used the word, “gemesas,” (as is found in 1 Corinthians 7:33) to describe “a married person.” He never said that there will be no married individuals in Heaven; He only said that marriages won’t be performed there. And I believe this to be the case.
     
  4. Halcyon

    Halcyon Lord of the Badgers

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    Thanks guys. I don't think i could have got a much more thorough answer than that katz, i'd frubal you but it won't let me :(

    And yes, i meant chapter 12 not 11. I should really stop doing this while i'm typing - - >:bonk:
     
  5. Katzpur

    Katzpur Not your average Mormon

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    That's quite alright. You have my permission to frubal me for something dumb I may say in the future. Then we'll be even. :D
     
  6. joeboonda

    joeboonda Well-Known Member

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    So I'll never be free!!! Just kidding, love my wife :)
     
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