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  #1  
Old 12-07-2011, 02:20 PM
Spear Hunter Offline
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Default Christians who deny Christ's divinity/Trinity

I have enjoyed reading the threads here, and would like to pose a question I have run into lately.

What are peoples thoughts here on professed Christians who do not believe in the divinity of Jesus or the literal trinity? Are they still to be considered Christians? I have read of some early Christian sects that did not believe in the trinity or Christs divinity. And I have met Christians today who do the same. They say they simply follow Christs teachings and worship God. Is this possible, why or why not?
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  #2  
Old 12-07-2011, 02:37 PM
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I would think that would make them Jewish, but it isn't that simple, I suppose. Christ teaches everything in the Old testament. Honestly, if you say you follow him, then he is God. Because, if you understand the teachings, we all are a part of God. If you believe that, he has to be God. As are we all.
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  #3  
Old 12-07-2011, 02:57 PM
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Yes, we are Christians. I don't believe the trinitarian doctrine. I believe in Christ's divinity. God dwells in him and God dwells in us.
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  #4  
Old 12-07-2011, 02:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spear Hunter View Post
I have enjoyed reading the threads here, and would like to pose a question I have run into lately.

What are peoples thoughts here on professed Christians who do not believe in the divinity of Jesus or the literal trinity? Are they still to be considered Christians? I have read of some early Christian sects that did not believe in the trinity or Christs divinity. And I have met Christians today who do the same. They say they simply follow Christs teachings and worship God. Is this possible, why or why not?
I would say that a Christian is one who believes that Jesus is the Son of God, died on the cross for our sins, and was resurrected from the dead. A true Christian must also try to follow the teachings of Jesus.

A belief in the divinity of Christ and the Trinity are separate issues. I don't believe in the Trinity as taught by the post New Testament creeds. I don't believe the New Testament teaches that doctrine. However, I believe in the divinity of Christ. I am a Christian.

Jehovah's Witnesses believe that Jesus is the Savior, but don't accept his divinity. (If I got that wrong a Jehovah's Witness can correct me). I see them as Christians, as they believe that Christ is the Savior.

Since this subject comes up a lot, I ask myself why it matters so much to some people. I think some believe that a person is saved now, forever, and irrevocably if and only if he is a Christian. For these people the question "are you a Christian?" is the same as "are you saved?" In their view, a person with less than a perfect understanding of the nature of Christ, is not saved and therefore can't be a Christian.

While I believe that salvation is in Christ, I don't see salvation in exactly those terms, so I don't worry much about who falls within the definition of Christian. Salvation is a process. There's space and time to learn and grow in our knowledge of the true God. There's time to learn to follow the true God and to repent. In the final judgement, only those who over time have come to understand, follow, and accept Jesus for the Savior and God that he is, will be saved. A person who is not there yet, may or may not be classified at this moment as a Christian.

Last edited by Scott C.; 12-07-2011 at 03:15 PM..
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  #5  
Old 12-07-2011, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Spear Hunter View Post
I have enjoyed reading the threads here, and would like to pose a question I have run into lately.

What are peoples thoughts here on professed Christians who do not believe in the divinity of Jesus or the literal trinity? Are they still to be considered Christians? I have read of some early Christian sects that did not believe in the trinity or Christs divinity. And I have met Christians today who do the same. They say they simply follow Christs teachings and worship God. Is this possible, why or why not?
I most definitely consider myself to be a Christian and I do not believe in the Trinity. (I'm referring to the doctrine established at the Council at Nicea in 325 A.D.) I do believe in God the Eternal Father, and in His Son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost. I believe that Jesus is divine and was with His Father in the beginning. I believe that He created our universe under His Father's direction, that He was born to a virgin, lived a perfect life, established His Church, voluntarily offered Himself up as a sacrifice to pay for our sins, rose from the dead after three days, and ascended into Heaven where He reigns today on the right hand of His Father. I believe He is the only means by which I can be forgiven of my sins and return to God's presence to live with Him again someday. I guess you could say that I have pretty much the same understanding of Jesus Christ, His relationship to His Father, and our relationship to them that the first century Christians had.
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  #6  
Old 12-07-2011, 08:36 PM
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Originally Posted by strikeviperMKII View Post
Because, if you understand the teachings, we all are a part of God. If you believe that, he has to be God. As are we all.
Wow. I agree, but I gotta say, that is very panentheistic for a "catholic"

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Originally Posted by Lucian View Post
Yes, we are Christians. I don't believe the trinitarian doctrine. I believe in Christ's divinity. God dwells in him and God dwells in us.
Note me as another christian who understands Christ´s divnity and role as son of God to be inclusive
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  #7  
Old 12-07-2011, 09:57 PM
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I've always wondered about Unitarians. What makes you be a Unitarian Christian and not a Jewish or Muslim since they are against the trinity. Is it Christ's message?
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  #8  
Old 12-07-2011, 11:04 PM
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Wow. I agree, but I gotta say, that is very panentheistic for a "catholic"
Catholic means 'universal'.
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Motir ca'tra nau tracinya.
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  #9  
Old 12-08-2011, 12:14 AM
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Originally Posted by thesadperson View Post
I've always wondered about Unitarians. What makes you be a Unitarian Christian and not a Jewish or Muslim since they are against the trinity. Is it Christ's message?
Yes it is, atleast that's one reason. There are a lot of differences. For Unitarians, God as our Father is very important. Jews don't believe in Jesus or his teachings, Unitarians do. Muslims, although they consider Jesus to be a part of their religion, Jesus' role is different. In Islam, Jesus was someone sent to preach about Mohammed, and only to the Jews - for Unitarians, Jesus' mission is universal, and Unitarians don't believe in Mohammed like the Muslims.

Muslims don't believe Jesus was crucified, Unitarians do. For Unitarians, Jesus is God's son, which is not allowed to be said in Islam or Judaism. Unitarians don't follow all the ritualistic rules of Judaism, only those based on the law of love (although nothing prevents following all kinds of rules as long as they don't contradict the law of love). Muslims also have their ritualistic rules which Unitarians don't believe. One is baptised in Unitarianism, in the others it's circumcision. I think one could continue this list.
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  #10  
Old 12-08-2011, 01:11 AM
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Anyone who doesn't believe in the trinity cannot claim to be a Christian.
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